Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii)

The Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is a carnivorous marsupial now found in the wild only in the Australian island state of Tasmania.

Tasmanian Devil feeding on a kangaroo carcass

The size of a small dog, but stocky and muscular, the Tasmanian Devil is now the largest carnivorous marsupial in the world after the extinction of the Tasmanian Tiger in 1936.

It is characterised by its black fur, pungent odour when stressed, extremely loud and disturbing screech, and ferocity when feeding. It is known to both hunt prey and scavenge 'road kill' or other carrion and although it is usually solitary, it will sometimes eat with other devils.

The Tasmanian Devil became extinct on the Australian mainland about 400 years before European settlement. Because they were seen as a threat to livestock in Tasmania, devils were hunted until 1941, when they became officially protected.

Since the late 1990s devil facial tumour disease has reduced the devil population significantly and now threatens the survival of the species, which in May 2009 was declared to be endangered. Programs are currently being undertaken by the Tasmanian government to reduce the impact of the disease.

The Tasmanian Devil became extinct on the Australian mainland about 400 years before European settlement. Because they were seen as a threat to livestock in Tasmania, devils were hunted until 1941, when they became officially protected.

Saving the Tasmanian Devil

Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD) is a deadly disease that is effecting the survival of Tasmanian Devils in the wild. Devil numbers have dropped alarmingly in the past 10 years and there is now a real threat that they could all be wiped out within a few years.

Baby Tasmanian Devil asleep with its mother

The devastating disease is sweeping through Tasmania's devil population and has killed more than 90% of adults in high density areas and 40-50% in medium to low density areas.

Australian zoos and wildlife parks are working together with the Tasmanian government to place 'healthy devils' into a breeding program the aims to maintain genetic diversity and create an 'insurance' population so that if the worst should happen and disease wipes them out in the wild, the zoos can repopulate devil habitat with healthy animals in the future.

Devil Digital is proud to support the Tasmanian Devil.

At Devil Digital we're passionate about helping to save the Tasmanian Devil from extinction.

Organisations directly involved in support projects are encouraged to contact us to discuss how we can help the fight to save these iconic natives.

We offer free directory listings and advertising across our network, access to web design and hosting packages and other assistance to Businesses, Wildlife Parks and Volunteer Organisations that are involved in programs to help save the devil.

 

Help save the Tasmanian Devil

Devil Digital gets its name from the native Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) a carnivorous marsupial found only in Tasmania.

Tasmanian Devils are widespread and fairly common throughout Tasmania, but are quickly dying from the deadly 'Devil Facial Tumour'.

If you are concerned about the plight of these iconic Tasmanian natives, you can find out more information about how you can help and where you can see a Tasmanian Devil from the links on this page.

Visit a Tasmanian Devil

East Coast Natureworld
Bicheno, Tasmania.
03 6375 1311
www.natureworld.com.au

Tasmanian Devil Conservation Park
Taranna, Tasmania.
03 6250 3230
www.tasmaniandevilpark.com

Trowunna Wildlife Park
Mole Creek, Tasmania.
03 6363 6162
www.trowunna.com.au

Devils Haven
Launceston, Tasmania.
03 6396 6100

Devils @ Cradle
Cradle Mountains, Tasmania
03 6492 1491
www.devilsatcradle.com

Outside Tasmania

Healesville Sanctuary
Healesville, Victoria
www.zoo.org.au

Pearcedale Conservation Park
Pearcedale, Victoria
www.pearcedale.com

Cleland Wildlife Park
Crafers, South Australia.
www.clelandwildlifepark.sa.gov.au

Western Plains Zoo
Dubbo, New South Wales.
www.taronga.org.au